Southport Reporter Bourder
Your free online newspaper for Merseyside...  

Read our Tracking & Cookie Usage Policy

Email | Latest edition | Archive | Terms & Conditions

Business Index Search


 

Navigation

 

Latest Edition
 

Back to Archive


Please beware that this is an archived news page.


This page has been archived as a historical record only.

ALL OFFERS / DEALS ARE NO LONGER VALID WITH IN THIS NEWS PAGE

Some features and links on this page might no longer be functioning.
 



© 2000-2013

PCBT Photography

Southport Reporter® is the Registered Trade Mark of Patrick Trollope.

Get your Google PageRank

 
 
 

Southport Reporter...News...Southport Reporter...News...Southport Reporter

20 September 2002

Southport Reporter...News...Southport Reporter...News...Southport Reporter

Film review:- Signs.

This film was not what I was expecting to see.  As in the `The Sixth Sense,' writer/director M. Night Shyamalan has produced a very griping and simplistic film that entraps you and pulls you in, with out the big budget special effects normally associated with ET films.   He even manages to put a religious undertone in and a philosophical sub plot, but that does at the end slightly give the film a  disappointing ending, but that is the only flawed in this still extremely powerful and enchanting film.  Over all this year has seen some of the best films for  long time hitting the box office, but I have to rate this as a master piece.  

The plot is very simplistic with  a  family living on a farm suddenly finds mysterious crop circles in their fields and has strange visits.  Soon this turns out to be sinister....  "It's Not Like They Didn't Warn Us." as the tag line goes.  

This film is not for the faint hearted as you do get pulled in and it does give you quite a shock in places.  The humor is very low key like the hole plot, but that adds to the realism that the film has.   This is an  almost perfect sci-fi film, if it was not for the end and the low budget costume.  But I will not say more.  M. Night Shyamalan cast this film well and considering the lines are not all that tasking Mel Gibson, who plays Graham Ness produces one of his best acting sessions as an Catholic priest.   The plot tell us that he lost his faith after loosing his wife in an accident and the story takes off with him living with his two young children and his younger brother.   Morgan (Rory Culkin) and Bo (Abigail Breslin) the two children, both play an extremely realistic role that adds to the tension.   Patricia Kalember  who plays Colleen Hess,  Graham brother, is not as good, but that helps make the others shines even brighter and draws you in further.  As the plot is very thin I will not tell you more...  

Over all this film deserves 5 out of 5 so I have decided to give that!   If you have not seen a film yet this year, YOU HAVE TO SEE THIS ONE!!!!!!!!!!!!! It will leave you utterly spellbound.

Film Review by Patrick Trollope

Graham (Mel Gibson, center) tries to calm his children, Morgan (Rory Culkin, left) and Bo (Abigail Breslin, right), who think that tin foil hats can stop aliens from reading their minds. 
©Touchstone Pictures. All rights reserved.

Cast credits. First credits only:- 

  • Mel Gibson as Father Graham Hess, Joaquin Phoenix as Merrill Hess, Cherry Jones as Officer Caroline Paski, Rory Culkin as Morgan Hess, Abigail Breslin as Bo Hess, Patricia Kalember as Colleen Hess, M. Night Shyamalan as Ray Reddy, D.V.M., Ted Sutton as SFC Cunningham 
    Merritt Wever as Tracey Abernathy, Lanny Flaherty as Mr. Nathan, Marion McCorry as Mrs. Nathan, Michael Showalter as Lionel Prichard, Kevin Pires as Brazilian Birthday Boy, Clifford David as Columbia University Professor and Rhonda Overby as Sarah Hughes 

  • Directed by:- Rob Bowman. 

    Film Running Time:- 106mins.

  • Our verdict 5 stars out of five stars.
      
    Film Age Rating 
    In The UK:-  
    Click to go back to this week's main page.

    HAVE YOUR SAY TODAY ABOUT THIS FILM OR ANY YOU HAVE SEEN!

     Southport Reporter is Trade Mark of Patrick Trollope.   Copyright © Patrick Trollope 2002.