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Southport Reporter

Edition No. 85

Date:- 31 January 2003

 VIP Tickets.... Now the last question!

Last Week So Who will win?

Shopping.......
Jenny Holzer Xenon for Liverpool.  
 


Jenny Holzer, Xenon for Liverpool, (computer generation) Above.

AS part of Tate Liverpool’s current exhibition Shopping: A Century of Art and Consumer Culture, Jenny Holzer will present a large-scale public projection during the exhibition’s final week. 

Visible only at night, moving text related to consumption, desire and femininity will be projected over the water onto Tate Liverpool’s building in the historic Albert Dock – commenting on the surrounding environment and transforming Liverpool’s urban landscape into a grandiose spectacle. 

Jenny Holzer is one of the most important artists of the last two decades. A primary focus of her work has been to find new means of disseminating ideas within public spaces and it is there that her work has achieved the greatest impact. She employs advertising and public announcement techniques in a spectacular yet subversive manner, merging the personal with the political.

On Saturday 22 March at 2.00pm there will be a rare opportunity to hear the artist talk about her work – in particular the text projection at Tate Liverpool.
 
Sponsored by Tate Members

Report with thanks from the Tate.
New Head of Exhibitions and Display at Tate Liverpool.

THE Tate Gallery are to appointment Simon Groom as their new Head of Exhibitions and Display at Tate Liverpool. He joins the gallery in February 2003 and succeeds Victoria Pommery, who has taken up the position of Director of the Turner Centre, Margate.

Simon Groom – returning to the city where he spent his early years – is looking forward to the challenge of working in an institution that he believes provides a continued capacity for innovation.

For the last three years Groom has been Exhibitions Officer at Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge and has delivered a programme of twentieth century and contemporary art exhibitions that raised the national and international profile of the gallery. He has curated Perfidy: Surviving Modernism (2000) – an exhibition that explored the legacy of modernism on the work of many prominent young contemporary artists, Mono-ha (2001) – the first UK exhibition of this Japan-based group, Flights of Reality (2002) – an exhibition that offered parallels with science in describing new routes of thought, Face/Off: A Portrait of the Artist (2002) and solo exhibitions of Luisa Lambri (2000), Jeremy Moon (2001) and Enrico Castellani (2002).

Previously Groom was Co-Director at E1 Gallery, London where he sourced new artists and implemented the exhibition programme for the launch of a new gallery. He has also worked at the Hayward Gallery, London and has international experience – spending time working in Italy and Japan.

Simon Groom received his MA and Ph.D. at the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London.

Christoph Grunenberg, Tate Liverpool’s Director says of the appointment, 
“I am delighted that Simon Groom is joining Tate Liverpool and that we have managed to attract such a qualified curator with a wide range of international experience. I am looking forward to Simon’s contribution which will further enhance the quality and range of Tate Liverpool programmes, supporting the city’s bid for Capital of Culture in 2008.”


Report thanks to the Tate.

Southport Reporter is Trade Mark of Patrick Trollope.   Copyright © Patrick Trollope 2003.